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Ronnie Barron

Bon Ton Roulette

1/5

Released: 1983

Label: Ace Records
Country: Germany
 

Dr. John

Dr. John was born Malcolm John Rebennack in New Orleans in 1941 and he’s been steeped in the city’s culture ever since, becoming one of it’s premiere advocates and representatives.

He grew up in the Third Ward, exposed to it’s music from the very start. He heard minstrel tunes sung by his grandfather and was surrounded by an extended family of piano players. His father owned an appliance store that also sold records and exposed him to the likes of King Oliver and Louis Armstrong. His dad also had connections in the recording world that propelled him into the clubs and onto the stages with local artists, eventually bringing him face to face with Professor Longhair at the age of 14.

About Longhair, Mac said the following: "I never seen nobody dressed like this guy. Just everything about the man was totally hip.”

He would begin the first of his collaborations with ‘Fess at that young age. From there, he found work at the age of 16 years old as a producer and playing at night clubs. The Jesuit fathers of his high school told that he had to make a choice: stay in school or stay in music. We’re all the better that he chose the latter.

Mac focused on guitar, up until an incident in the 1960’s when, while defending his friend and bandmate, Ronnie Barron, he was injured by a gunshot, damaging his finger. He would turn his focus to bass and then piano after that.

The name and persona of Dr. John came about as an act originally developed for Ronnie Barron. Ronnie didn’t want do it, so Mac became Dr. John, profiled after the original Doctor John, a medicinal and spiritual healer who came to New Orleans from Haiti. Mac turned the act into “Dr. John, The Night Tripper”, combining New Orleans-style rhythm and blues with psychedelic rock and elaborate performances with elaborate costumes and headdress, borrowing from voodoo religious ceremonies.

Malcolm John Rebennack, Mac Rebennack, Dr. John Creaux, Dr. John the Night Tripper, whichever name you use, Dr. John has an amazing list of accomplishments. He’s recorded more than 20 albums, had a top ten hit with 1973’s Right Place, Wrong Time, has won six Grammy Awards, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2011, and has an honorary doctorate of fine arts from Tulane University. The first Dr. John project, Gris Gris made Rolling Stone′s "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" list.
He’s played for or collaborated with an amazing list of people, including Doc Pomus, Sonny  & Cher, Canned Heat, Frank Zappa, the Rolling Stones, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Neil Diamond, Van Morrison, Levon Helm, Harry Connick Jr., Lou Reed, Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band, and, for those younger in the audience, Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys. He also collaborated on Professor Longhair’s last recording Crawfish Fiesta.

He performed with the Band at their farewell concert, as featured in Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz. He also has movie credits including Blues Brothers 2000, a song for Disney’s 101 Dalmatians & The Princess and the Frog, and the score for Cannery Row. He was also interviewed by Dave Grohl in the excellent music documentary series, Sonic Highways.

And that’s not all. Remember that “Luv That Chicken” jingle from  Popeyes’s? That was Dr. John. He sang the theme song for the 90’s sitcom, Blossom. And he was the inspiration for the Jim Henson's Muppet character, Dr. Teeth.

This man has done it all.

Dr. John's Gumbo

Released: 1972

Label: ATCO Records
Country: US
 

Dr. John Plays Mac Rebennack

1/4

Released: 1981

Label: Clean Cuts
Country: US

 
 

Dr. John

Dr. John was born Malcolm John Rebennack in New Orleans in 1941 and he’s been steeped in the city’s culture ever since, becoming one of it’s premiere advocates and representatives.

He grew up in the Third Ward, exposed to it’s music from the very start. He heard minstrel tunes sung by his grandfather and was surrounded by an extended family of piano players. His father owned an appliance store that also sold records and exposed him to the likes of King Oliver and Louis Armstrong. His dad also had connections in the recording world that propelled him into the clubs and onto the stages with local artists, eventually bringing him face to face with Professor Longhair at the age of 14.

About Longhair, Mac said the following: "I never seen nobody dressed like this guy. Just everything about the man was totally hip.”

He would begin the first of his collaborations with ‘Fess at that young age. From there, he found work at the age of 16 years old as a producer and playing at night clubs. The Jesuit fathers of his high school told that he had to make a choice: stay in school or stay in music. We’re all the better that he chose the latter.

Mac focused on guitar, up until an incident in the 1960’s when, while defending his friend and bandmate, Ronnie Barron, he was injured by a gunshot, damaging his finger. He would turn his focus to bass and then piano after that.

The name and persona of Dr. John came about as an act originally developed for Ronnie Barron. Ronnie didn’t want do it, so Mac became Dr. John, profiled after the original Doctor John, a medicinal and spiritual healer who came to New Orleans from Haiti. Mac turned the act into “Dr. John, The Night Tripper”, combining New Orleans-style rhythm and blues with psychedelic rock and elaborate performances with elaborate costumes and headdress, borrowing from voodoo religious ceremonies.

Malcolm John Rebennack, Mac Rebennack, Dr. John Creaux, Dr. John the Night Tripper, whichever name you use, Dr. John has an amazing list of accomplishments. He’s recorded more than 20 albums, had a top ten hit with 1973’s Right Place, Wrong Time, has won six Grammy Awards, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2011, and has an honorary doctorate of fine arts from Tulane University. The first Dr. John project, Gris Gris made Rolling Stone′s "The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" list.
He’s played for or collaborated with an amazing list of people, including Doc Pomus, Sonny  & Cher, Canned Heat, Frank Zappa, the Rolling Stones, Carly Simon, James Taylor, Neil Diamond, Van Morrison, Levon Helm, Harry Connick Jr., Lou Reed, Ringo Starr & His All-Starr Band, and, for those younger in the audience, Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys. He also collaborated on Professor Longhair’s last recording Crawfish Fiesta.

He performed with the Band at their farewell concert, as featured in Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz. He also has movie credits including Blues Brothers 2000, a song for Disney’s 101 Dalmatians & The Princess and the Frog, and the score for Cannery Row. He was also interviewed by Dave Grohl in the excellent music documentary series, Sonic Highways.

And that’s not all. Remember that “Luv That Chicken” jingle from  Popeyes’s? That was Dr. John. He sang the theme song for the 90’s sitcom, Blossom. And he was the inspiration for the Jim Henson's Muppet character, Dr. Teeth.

This man has done it all.

Profile photo from nitetripper.com

Dr. John's Gumbo

Released: 1972

Label: ATCO Records
Country: US
 

Listen-Apple-Music.png

Dr. John Plays Mac Rebennack

1/4

Released: 1981

Label: Clean Cuts
Country: US

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